Thiamine And Thyroid Fatigue

Could Thiamine be the missing link to your thyroid fatigue, stressed out adrenals and low stomach acid? Italian clinicians Dr. Antonio Costantini and nurse Maria Immacolata Pala, have hypothesized that the chronic fatigue that accompanies inflammatory and autoimmune diseases may be a result of a mild thiamine deficiency. They had already found that thiamine helped relieve the fatigue in people with Ulcerative Colitis (an autoimmune condition that affects the gut) and decided to try using thiamine in three women with Hashimoto’s, who were on thyroid medications but continued to experience fatigue.

Two of the women were given an oral dose of thiamine (600mg) per day, while the third was given an injection of 100mg every four days.

All of the women were given a survey to rate their fatigue before starting the thiamine, and again the same questionnaire 20 days into the treatment. All three reported that they experienced a relief in their fatigue during the second survey, and two had a complete remission of their fatigue!

The woman who had the injection felt that her fatigue was lifted within 6 hours of receiving it, while the women who took the oral dose of thiamine felt relief within 3-5 days.

Interestingly, none of the women had thiamine deficiency on standard lab tests that are used to measure thiamine status.

What is Thiamine

Thiamine is one of the B vitamins, known as B1. Its main responsibility is to change carbohydrates into energy, and it also helps with the digestion of proteins and fats. Thiamine is necessary for proper release of hydrochloric acid in our stomachs, which is required for proper protein digestion. Most people with Hashimoto’s have low stomach acid or do not release any stomach acid.

The recommended daily allowance for thiamine is only 1.1mg for women >19 years of age, and may not meet the needs of those who are on a grain free diet and have malabsorption issues.

Food sources of Thiamine include fortified grains, beef liver, and pork, dried milk, eggs, legumes and peas, nuts and seeds.

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